When I tested Google’s Daydream View headset, I called it one of the best phone-based VR headsets. But the with Google and Lenovo’s collaboration on Mirage Solo, it shows a step in the right direction for the evolution of mobile VR.

The Mirage Solo is a great headset but it doesn’t offer that much more than the standard Daydream View headset.

Design & Hardware

The Mirage Solo has a grey and white plastic build that is reminiscent of the Gear VR. The headset has an adjustable knob on the back which makes it easier to wear. The headset weighs about 645 g, it slightly heavy while on your face but not too uncomfortable.

Unlike the Daydream View, the Mirage Solo doesn’t require a phone to use, it works on its own.

There is a cushion eye pad to help make the headset more comfortable to wear. The headset has a 5.5-inch QHD display and powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processor with 4GB of RAM.

There’s also 64GB of internal storage and a microSD card slot. The Mirage Solo has a 4,000 mAh battery which is good enough for a couple of hours of VR. The headset and controller charges over USB-C and there’s a 3.5mm headphone jack on the headset too.

The Mirage Solo supports 6 DOF (Degrees-Of-Freedom) as well as Google’s WorldSense technology which can track you in the real world without needing additional sensors. The controller for the Mirage Solo is exactly like the one that comes with the Daydream View but in a lighter grey colour.

The Mirage Solo is available now from Lenovo’s website for $499 CAD ($399 USD), to put that into comparison. The Daydream View is $139 CAD (plus the cost of a compatible phone), the standalone Oculus Go headset is $269 CAD and the Oculus Rift + Touch Controller bundle is $529 CAD (plus the cost of a compatible PC).

Paying $500 for the Mirage Solo may seem like a lot, but you’re getting a high-quality mobile VR experience without needing to shell out more for a compatible phone.

Software

The Mirage Solo is running Google Daydream platform and if you’ve used the Daydream View, the software experience is basically the same.

Once you turn on the headset, you’ll be greeted with the Daydream home where you’ll see your installed apps and games plus new ones available in the Play Store.

The Mirage Solo had a couple of Daydream apps pre-installed such Blade Runner: Revelations, Virtual Virtual Reality, BBC Earth: Life in VR, Merry Snowballs and Extreme Whiteout.

All those apps mentioned support WorldSense. All the games and apps I played on the Mirage Solo felt exactly the same as on the Daydream View. I didn’t find that the Mirage Solo made all that big of a difference.

Lenovo and Google say there are over 250 apps and games for Google Daydream. That’s quite a bit to choose from but a lot of them are paid VR experiences and some of them can get quite expensive as much as $20.99 but a lot of them are between $7.99 and $11.99 CAD.

Final Thoughts

Overall, I had a lot of fun using the Mirage Solo. It’s a great way to experience VR without needing a phone or PC. But it’s not really worth it if you already have a Daydream View and compatible phone since you’re basically getting the same experience on a bigger headset.

Pros

  • Fits well and adjustable
  • Daydream is easy to use
  • Phone-free VR
  • WorldSense tracking works well
  • Solid battery life
  • High-quality display

Cons

  • Needs more content
  • Similar experience to the Daydream View
  • Slightly expensive
  • Heavy to wear

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